H-Regulator: Helping you maintain your independence

Abstract: For multiple reasons, menopausal and post-menopausal women face a significantly increased risk of developing osteoporosis. [1] Primarily, this is due to the fact that when women undergo menopause, they effectively cease to produce the hormone, oestrogen. Because menopause causes oestrogen deficiency, which is linked with the development of osteoporosis, a logical intervention to guard against the onset of osteoporosis is supplementation with oestrogens. However, long-term treatment with oestrogens may be limited due to its potentially negative health effects: it has repeatedly been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in women [2-4], an increased risk of endometrial adenocarcinoma and endometrial hyperplasia.[5] Recent focus has centred around the phytoestrogen compounds, particularly soy isoflavones, which are naturally occurring and structurally resemble endogenous  oestrogens, and are contained in H-Regulator.

Every 8 minutes, someone is admitted to a hospital with an osteoporotic fracture.[6] Significantly increasing the risk of falls and fractures, osteoporosis is a relatively common disease affecting men and women in later life. Stemming from the Greek words ‘osteo–,’ meaning “bone,” and ‘porosis,’ meaning “passages” or “holes,” osteoporosis is strictly defined by the World Health Organisation as having a bone density of more than 2.5 standard deviations less than the average peak bone mass reached around the age of 20.[7] This decrease in bone density increases the chance of individuals suffering an osteoporosis fracture, which can lead to severe and chronic pain, disability, loss of independence and, ultimately, premature death. However, until such a fracture occurs, osteoporosis usually has very few signs or symptoms. For this reason, osteoporosis is often called “the silent disease.”

Menopause, Oestrogen Deficiency and Osteoporosis

For multiple reasons, menopausal and post-menopausal women face a significantly increased risk of developing osteoporosis. [1] Primarily, this is due to the fact that when women undergo menopause, they effectively cease to produce the hormone, oestrogen.

The onset of osteoporosis is linked with the ongoing process of bone turnover. The human skeleton comprises two main types of bone: compact and trabecular. As its name suggests, compact bone is firm and solid; trabecular bone has a porous appearance similar to that of a sponge. In healthy, mature adult bone, there is a considerable amount of turnover as the bone is remodeled. Firstly, bone cells called osteoclasts assemble together to excavate a cavity on the bone’s surface by a process known as bone resorption. Once erosion is complete, osteoclast cells are replaced by osteoblast cells, which then fill in the excavation cavity with new bone. [8] This process allows the removal, repair and regeneration of bone damaged by stress and fatigue.

One of the early effects of the oestrogen deficiency which occurs during and at the completion of menopause is accelerated bone turnover. [8] This increases the total amount of bone remodeling across the skeleton, such that at any one time a progressively greater surface of the bone will be undergoing remodeling events. [8] Because bone remodeling necessarily implies a net deficit of bone (because bone cavities are continually being created at a rate faster than others can be filled in), the total skeletal volume will decrease proportionately as bone turnover continues in an accelerated fashion. [9] That is, as bone remodeling continues, skeletal mass and density decrease incrementally. And the less bone contained within our skeletons, the weaker our bones become. And the more susceptible they are to fracture.

Because menopause causes oestrogen deficiency, which is linked with the development of osteoporosis, a logical intervention to guard against the onset of osteoporosis is supplementation with oestrogens. In fact, a great deal of evidence suggests that ongoing oestrogen supplementation may actually increase bone density by inducing small increments in skeletal mass which are not followed by progressive decreases in bone through osteoclast excavation. [8, 10] Further studies demonstrate that the ongoing use of hormone replacement therapy (which contains oestrogen) by women will prevent bone loss at menopause and thereafter. [8, 11]

However, long-term treatment with oestrogens may be limited due to its potentially negative health effects: it has repeatedly been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in women [2-4], an increased risk of endometrial adenocarcinoma and endometrial hyperplasia.[5] Accordingly, current treatment guidelines indicate that HRT and oestrogen replacement therapy should be used only in the short term for moderate-to-severe symptoms, with the lowest effective dose for treatment. [12] As a result, a number of complementary and alternative therapies have found favour among millions of women around the world.

Soy Isoflavones for Osteoporosis Prevention and Treatment

Recent focus has centred around the phytoestrogen compounds, particularly soy isoflavones, which are naturally occurring and structurally resemble endogenous  oestrogens. These compounds can act as selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), essentially meaning that they may mediate oestrogenic effects in certain parts of the body, but not in others. [13] Most importantly, phytoestrogens do not appear to mediate the negative reproductive effects experienced with chronic oestrogen therapy, and do not seem to increase the risk of endometrial or breast cancer. [14, 15]

A considerable number of studies [1, 16-20] have shown that daily supplementation with 80-90mg of soy isoflavones can significantly increase bone mineral density and slow bone density loss associated with menopause, presumably as a result of their oestrogenic activity. As such, soy isoflavones represent an effective treatment to guard against menopause-related bone loss and osteoporosis without the negative health concerns associated with ongoing oestrogen therapy.

H-Regulator

For the prevention of menopause-related bone loss, H-Regulator contains 80mg of soy isoflavones in each capsule. Not only is this dosage of isoflavones proven to prevent bone loss among peri-menopausal women – it is also effective in providing relief from other unwanted symptoms related to change of life such as hot flushes, perspiration and insomnia. H-Regulator also contains chasteberry, an effective supplement for the reduction of PMS-related distress, unwanted menstrual symptoms, and for the maintenance of hormonal balance.

H-Regulator arms you with the tools you need to undergo natural change of life without the negative side effects that it can entail. Helping to lower the risk of developing conditions such as osteoporosis, as well as reducing the severity of other menopausal symptoms, H-Regulator helps you to age gracefully, naturally, and healthily, while maintaining your independence. Maintaining your health and vitality as you age is important. Try H-Regulator today – the natural and effective health alternative for hormonal balance and bone support.

References
1. Arjmandi BH, Khalil DA, Smith BJ, Lucas EA, Juma S, Payton ME, Wild RA: Soy protein has a greater effect on bone in postmenopausal women not on hormone replacement therapy, as evidenced by reducing bone resorption and urinary calcium excretion. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2003, 88(3):1048-1054.
2. Bakken K, Alsaker E, Eggen AE, Lund E: [Estrogen replacement therapy and breast cancer]. Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen 2005, 125(3):282-285.
3. Colditz GA: Estrogen, estrogen plus progestin therapy, and risk of breast cancer. Clin Cancer Res 2005, 11(2 Pt 2):909s-917s.
4. Ewertz M, Mellemkjaer L, Poulsen AH, Friis S, Sorensen HT, Pedersen L, McLaughlin JK, Olsen JH: Hormone use for menopausal symptoms and risk of breast cancer. A Danish cohort study. Br J Cancer 2005, 92(7):1293-1297.
5. Zukerberg LR, DeBernardo RL, Kirley SD, D’Apuzzo M, Lynch MP, Littell RD, Duska LR, Boring L, Rueda BR: Loss of cables, a cyclin-dependent kinase regulatory protein, is associated with the development of endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer. Cancer Res 2004, 64(1):202-208.
6. Osteoporosis Australia: “What is Osteoporosis?” http://wwwosteoporosisorgau/osteo_osteoporosis.php 2007:Accessed 23 May, 2008.
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12. U.S Preventative Services Task Force: Hormone therapy for the prevention of chronic conditions in postmenopausal women: Recommendations from the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force. Anals of Internal Medicine 2005, 142(10):855-860.
13. Mueller SO, Simon S, Chae K, Metzler M, Korach KS: Phytoestrogens and their human metabolites show distinct agonistic and antagonistic properties on estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and ERbeta in human cells. Toxicol Sci 2004, 80(1):14-25.
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16. Potter SM, Baum JA, Teng H, Stillman RJ, Shay NF, Erdman JW, Jr.: Soy protein and isoflavones: their effects on blood lipids and bone density in postmenopausal women. Am J Clin Nutr 1998, 68(6 Suppl):1375S-1379S.
17. Alekel DL, Germain AS, Peterson CT, Hanson KB, Stewart JW, Toda T: Isoflavone-rich soy protein isolate attenuates bone loss in the lumbar spine of perimenopausal women. Am J Clin Nutr 2000, 72(3):844-852.
18. Ho SC, Chan SG, Yi Q, Wong E, Leung PC: Soy intake and the maintenance of peak bone mass in Hong Kong Chinese women. J Bone Miner Res 2001, 16(7):1363-1369.
19. Chen YM, Ho SC, Lam SS, Ho SS, Woo JL: Soy isoflavones have a favorable effect on bone loss in Chinese postmenopausal women with lower bone mass: a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2003, 88(10):4740-4747.
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